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20121027
20121104
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's what i've done. cut metal -- taxes on middle-class families and small businesses that create jobs, and over burdensome regulations on our farmers. make sure we keep our promise to seniors on medicare, as well as make sure we support our military and support the niagara falls -- also have to make sure we balanced the budget the right way. i've been so blessed to live the american dream. just like my mom and dad by starlight together in a trailer in the shadows of the steel plant. i promise to continue to be strong independent voice and a fighter to make sure everyone in this great country has the same shot i take it that's my commitment to you. collins: well, good evening. i'm chris collins. i'm running for congress to do my part to help restore the promise of the american dream for our children and our grandchildren. our country is at a tipping point. my granddaughter turned one just last saturday. she has $52,000 of debt. federal debt at her feet. my two kids in college are worried they're not going to have a job when they graduate. that's unacceptable. my 85 year-old mom is worr
and to reduce regulation and keep taxes low, so that businesses can expand and people can get jobs and they can feed their families and pay their mortgage and send their kids to school. i think that the choice we have to make on november 6 is very clear. you can choose someone who took a $200 million surplus, increases spending by 50% and let us with the highest tax burden in the country, or you can choose me. i would like to go to washington and lead the fight to reduce spending and reduce regulation and do things to grow this economy, and i would appreciate your vote. >> moderator: steve woods? woods: i'm a businessman and chairman of my local town council. this campaign and other campaigns bother me. cynthia, i am tired of your constant criticism of old wealthy white men. i think it is undignified for a u.s. senate candidate. charlie, i'm tired of your gross distortion of truth in regard to angus king come and i'm tired of your tv commercials ruining all my favorite shows on abc. i get it. 1.3 million. we both think that angus is responsible for terrible things. that and everything else. but
or regulating drugs as a means of doing both of those? >> i'm all for it. i don't want anything taxed at all, but, yeah, i mean, this is -- we may be getting to a pragmatic kind of prohibition era question where it became expedient to legalize alcohol so that you could be, you know, getting some of the great -- so that the federal -- the government could be getting some of the proceeds from that great cash crop, and, you know, marijuana, as we all know, the biggest cash crop in the country. again, you know, i'm looking for the liberals to step up to the plate here. i hear this thing about, oh, wait until obama's relegislated, he'll stop laughing any time anybody mentions this, the idea of legalization. it's not just a libertarian fancy. in opinion polls and in the voting in referendum in all of the states that it's come up in, it's more popular than gay marriage, more popular than a lot of stuff that moved into the consensus of acceptable discussion. it's only in official in washington that this has not been, you know, accepted, and, by the way, i hate to pick the liberals down one more time
recently would you accept the $1 tax increase for $10 in cuts, and you said yes. dold: sure. >> moderator: somewhere between that and 70/30, i mean, just as a general proposition? dold: well, certainly what i took as a framework in what we did, we laid out a broad framework that was talking about a bipartisan budget that would put revenues on the table and also spending cuts. i don't want to say we'd say it's got to be this or that simply because we don't know what the proposals are going to be. we do face a fiscal cliff, and the only way i think we're going to resolve this problem is by coming together and working together as i've done in this last 22 months. >> moderator: brad schneider, how did you come up with the split? schneider: if you look at what we've had in this past congress, a congress that has done everything but address the challenges we face, you have a ryan plan that not once, but twice my opponent voted for that continues to give additional benefits and cuts to the most fortunate americans, additional subsidies to large oil companies and companies shipping jobs overseas.
extension of state authority? >> well, i think the issue is less about the tax breaks and more about preserving the policy decision made by the state of oklahoma. there is a responsibility vested in each state in this country to make a decision presently about whether they adopt a state health care exchange, and there are factors that drive that. there are reasons to do that. there are reasons not to do that, but we ought to play by the rules that have been set up by the affordable care agent so the state can make a formal decision. if we adopt x, the benefit would be want? the feds wouldn't force upon the state of oklahoma a health care exchange, but if you don't implement a health care exchange, the affordable care act is clear in its language here's what flows from that. the irs disregarded that. they acted in a way that's inconsistent with the apa by adopting this rule on may 18th. it's the state's responsibility, and there may be other states that join this because, again, 20 # or so states have not adopted an exchange. it's about preserving the ability of the state to decide wh
and that is by asking the wealthiest people and the largest corporations to start paying their fair share of taxes. i was talking about it gets us to solve that problem over a period of ten years. i thought ten years was too long basically. that was not an endorsement of every single item in the budget but the direction is going in, and whether or not i would support cutting if i supported that the budget i don't know. i have to look at the budget and see what cuts are necessary, but the most important point to remember is this. half of the budget is reform of the tax code to get the economy flat in the tax rates, lower the rates or on the base deutsch a trillion dollars of credits and the major corporations might take advantage to get the economy going and get revenues back up, get people back to work and you have less need for these programs and if it was to save the country to do it in a responsible way. >> i will get to it in a moment i'm not putting your words in your mouth. i want to understand in the short term over the next year or two would you cut the liheap funding of? diamondstone: if i w
, when harry reid stands up and says, hey, i heard a rumor that mitt romney didn't pay his taxes, and mitch mcconnell stands up and says i'm going to make you a one-term president, they're acting like kindergarteners. we need new leadership that will say we are now working for the american people. forget politics, forget party. it is time for us to move forward, and when i'm back in washington, i promise you i'll work with either president. >> moderator: senator hatch, a rebuttal. hatch: well, i have to say i've had democrats come up to me during that very difficult preconvention time and say you've got to win. you're one of the few guys that can bring us together. it wasn't just with senator kennedy, it was with dozen of others. henry waxman is the most liberal guy in the house of representatives, but he's brilliant. we did the hatch-waxman act that was done right in my office. by anybody's measure, it's one of the best consumer bills in history. i can do it. >> moderator: rebuttal, mr. howell. howell: well, you know, i appreciate our senator talking about the past. he's gone so
embrace a balanced approach. that is what i support. i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had and the clinton administration, those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices. a balanced approach is the only approach that i believe will get us there. >> heather, your rebuttal. >> it is amazing to me, congressman, that you can stand here having voted for trillion dollar deficits for the last four years. the largest, fastest debt increase in american history and say that we have to control spending. you have done nothing to control spending of the last four years, and with respect to cuts, cap, and balance it is amazing to me also that the idea of cutting wasteful spending, capping the ability of congress to spend money we don't have and balancing the budget is extreme. i think it would force congress to set priorities and stop funding things like solyndra and prioritize things like social security, medicare, and education, and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution.
a volunteer service to help income ineligible people get taxes done for free. last year, completed 700 tax returns saving the elderly, working families, and students at least $133,000. the program's total economic impact was nearly $1 million. thank you, kathy. [applause] finally, i want to introduce dr. report paulson, professors in the college of agriculture sciences. could you please stand? their inspiring collaboration discovered what could be a promising treatment for leukemia. in laboratory tests, the compound they developed targeted and killed leukemia stem cells without relapse. their team, including undergraduate, as well as graduate students is now working to move this compound into clinical trials as soon as possible. thank you, bob and sandy. [applause] these are penn staters leading us into the future. they are the people i work for every day. they are the reason i'm here today, and they are just a few of the penn staters who will not allow anything to stop them from changing our world for the better. with that in mine, i want to spend a few minutes looking ahead because we're
-class tax cuts so they are no longer held hostage. you're willing to join majority and hold him hostage and not giving it should assurance. i want him to have that i want a farm bill passed so our farmers now delayed olympic i want to stand with our seniors and make sure that we don't balance the budget on their backs and break the promise to medicare we had to i believe mitt romney has ideas as well. i'm not so my way or the highway that i can't look at people objectively and go with what i think is best to every issue that comes before me, my question will be, what's best for this district. that's how i've operated and i continued to do so as a member of congress next year. >> just to be quick on your voting for president obama? hochul: i've said that before, yes. >> okay. there is another question on the floor. other congresswoman to mr. koh, if you will. hochul: chris, i joined mitt romney, president obama, kirsten gillibrand come when the long and many others in full disclosure because i put transparency is important. full disclosure of personal tax return by putting them online so
in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have served the people of pennsylvania to have earned their trust and i would ask again to have the opportunity to earn the trust and i would ask for your vote on november 6. thank you. >> moderator: speed become a gentleman that concludes the debate and we want to think the candidates for taking part in this important program. we also want to think of course monica malpass and vernon odom from action news and thank you for watching. now we have these final words from our co-sponsors and thank you so much for being here. >> i of the
that's different from the tax reform that's needed for the nation, when we look at the border we need comprehensive immigration reform. as a troubled border and meet with the agricultural folks and ranchers, we have a workforce problem because the immigration system is broken, the visa system is broken, we can't get workers to go back and forth, it takes hours to go back and forth. these create an impediment to commerce, so we have to be able to provide a workforce that can move back and forth very easily. and right now, we are not able to do that because of all of the impediments that aren't there not by having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. so that becomes an economic issue as well. >> some of the issues have to do with the issue that was raised here with regard to being near the border. the work that comes on and being especially susceptible to the national trends when it comes to unemployment in the economy. we need to do some things desperately here like a commuter plane that will make it easier for labor to come across from the daytime and go back at night. that'
. heinrich: my priorities are new mexico's priorities, protecting social security and medicare, tax cuts for the middle-class, keeping promises to veterans and making college more affordable for everyone. heather wilson has all the wrong priorities. you voted for the wall street bailout and the george bush tax cuts that exploded our deficit and now she wants even more tax breaks for millionaires. she supports 0 program called pat cap and balance that would require deep cuts to social security and medicare. i will never balance the budget on the backs of our seniors. medicare and social security argentine went. they're a promise we made to our seniors and a promise i intend to keep. i come home every weekend to meet with new mexicans, old job fairs, raise my family. i am always fought for the things that matter most to the people of the state and if you send me to the united states senate i will continue that fight and be honored to have your support. >> moderator: representative will some. it could 21 i see an opportunity society opposite safety net. i support social security and medicar
vict troy ten to hundred. there's a movement around ending placic bags in america. increasing the tax to internalize the third party cost of plastic bags. it's almost impossible. >> in maryland. >> yeah. in changes in individual cities. in the way you win the nationalist is winning by the local. a 13-year-old who has a eighth grade project starts a campaign asking to pass the plastic bag tax. gets a state law passed in the state of illinois to make it illegal to pass the plastic bags taxes. she respond to veto the bill. and after getting more than 100,000 people to join. huge media narrative. the governor calls her on the home phone about a month ago and says i've seen your campaign. i'm going veto the bill. in response you have all the young girls that are starting campaigns around the country in their townings trying to -- you don't win the vict you start the single up with. >> so the -- that does -- you were describe it asking aggravating -- dow see a way to tackle some of the bigger issues you would be concerned about? how does this, for example, translate in to climate change. on
to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration when those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices and a balanced approach is the only approach i believe will get us there. >> heather, your rebuttal? >> it's amazing to me congressman heinrich that you can stand here having voted for a trillion dollar deficits for the last four years, the largest debt increase in american history and say that we have to control spending. you have done nothing to control spending over the last four years and with respect to cut gap and balance it's amazing to me also this idea of cutting wasteful spending, capping the ability of congress to spend money we don't have and balancing the budget is extreme. i think it would force congress to set priorities and stop funding things like solyndra and prioritize things like social security, medicare and education and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. e. republican congre
will -- expansion wi. i guess my point is that many low income families don't file taxes. so the information that is -- because they're not required to, not because they're out of compliance. but they may not be required to file taxes. so snap information may be available in a way that you can fast track their medicaid eligibility because they provided recent information to the snap agency. so i don't think that that really, um, complicates the opportunities for coordinating between nap and medicaid significantly. >> thank you very much. i am going to give our panelists an opportunity if any of you have closing remarks that you'd like to jump in with before we wrap it up, or -- okay. well, thank you all very much for coming. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> this program will reair on our c-span video web site, go to c-span.org. very quickly, president obama's put off campaigning for the two days to attend to hurricane relief efforts. he'll return to the campaign trail tomorrow, actually. in the meantime, vice president biden stands in for the president at an event in ocala, florida, t
have been on the subject, given how much of it we have talked about. significant things like tax policy and policies on deficits. i think there is going to be a long period of time before we will get any action on this. i'm just talking about when someone puts out an idea, which has to be challenged in congress and debated, and then you get something fast, and then you have the implementation. after all, think about where we are as far as implementation in terms of obamacare. unfortunately, i am very pessimistic about when we finally get resolution. >> yes, sir. >> i am a student at harvard kennedy school. you started your remarks talking about the incredible remarks before the conservatorship. as we think about the entities that will follow, how we think about creating an appropriate amount of political installation against lobbying when it comes to capital requirements or appropriately pricing governments guarantee? >> that is a real important question. i can tell you that during my time in the conservatorship. we had really strong restrictions. we were not able to make any political
-down world where saying harmless words like that can bear huge tax on the other side and yet the other side can say very toxic comments without repercussions or being held to the same standard. one example is mark lamont hill. you may have seen a recent article, the most overweighted right--the most overrated white people to shakespeare and in the current climate the only thing worse than being a white person, speaking those words is being a black person who steps out of line. slicken stacey dash and thank you for standing up for her so valiantly. [applause] >> it would be funnier if it wasn't so wrong. that is the truth. as frederick douglass said liberty is meaningless when the right to other thoughts and opinions has ceased to exist. ann coulter is not just the champion of freedom of speech, she practices it vigorously every single day. i will leave you with this. the most accurate comment about her current book came from the american spectator. he said this. it is not just a book. is a public service. i agree with that wholeheartedly. and coulter is indeed a public servant and i would
. significant things like tax policy and policies on deficits. i think there is going to be a long period of time before we will get any action on this. i'm just talking about when someone puts out an idea, which has to be challenged in congress and debated, and then you get something fast, and then you have the implementation. after all, think about where we are as far as implementation in terms of obamacare. unfortunately, i am very pessimistic about when we finally get resolution. >> yes, sir. >> i am a student at harvard kennedy school. you started your remarks talking about the incredible remarks before the conservatorship. as we think about the entities that will follow, how we think about creating an appropriate amount of political installation against lobbying when it comes to capital requirements or appropriately pricing governments guarantee? >> that is a real important question. i can tell you that during my time in the conservatorship. we had really strong restrictions. we were not able to make any political contributions. not just the corporate level, but i, personally, was n
at the time. first of all we're lots of small tax cuts that were essential to those families. secondly, we kept police on the street, kept or teachers to me laid off in our classrooms from blowing up in size. and firefighters. so certainly we had to do something. the thing that i am really confused about, that's bad but there do the right thing on the taxes apparently. but now some of the economy is starting to be fine for millionaires and billionaires. i'm doing the wrong thing by asking them to pay their share. and get we need to balance the budget but where is the money going to come from? none of it adds up. >> moderator: urso, your reaction. rozum: i think would be immoral to repeal the affordable good activist. there's too many good parts i think we move forward. repealing that wouldn't get us where we need to go which is medicare for all systems which make it much easier for employers to hire workers and provide health care for them because they would be paying a simple medical payroll tax. it hasn't proven to be true because there should be increased by from medical devices under t
mind about. i've maintained ferociously liberals can't learn that if you cut taxes, there's revenue to the treasury, can't learn it doesn't work to coddle and suck up to terrorists, but, apparently, they can learn if they attack ann coulter, she sells more books. [laughter] i love those gals on "the view," and i wanted to kiss them all before i left. [laughter] you know, i realize that people who are familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make the same mistake again, america. that's why it had to come out before the election. it's a book about racism, and to my critics chagrin, i'm against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it, and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70s and 80s when every police
, the cleverness and the way of evading tax are improving faster on the good side of things. and of course that is very troubling in part because when you boil it all down, no one still fully understands what happens when billions of people and billions of devices interact in cyberspace and the bad guy takes advantage of those clouds. >> host: charlie miller what is your message to congress to the department of homeland security and to dod? >> guest: well, i guess it would be that we spend a lot of time, we are a lot better than we were 10 years ago. we are less vulnerable in the software is a lot better and we have a lot more protections built-in so if you want to run a company and keep out damage we know how to do that but we don't know how to do is secure via no military systems against attacks by other governments. so well funded, very very smart hack or is still can do that and we don't going to do with that right now. we need to figure out whether it's vendor attacks are building defenses and we need to figure out how to defend against sophisticated tax which is something we don't go
a scandalously disgustingly low tax rate need to talk to some democrats. people i like and admire like chuck schumer the democrats became the party of wall street in many ways and walked away from their legacy and there is a reason that the people stopped trusting them to look out for the interest of working people and the middle class people. >> the politicians pander to the middle class will do here is the middle class tax cut but it is a shrinking number of people and we have the very rich and the very poor. to touch on this in the book but what impact do you think the occupy wall street movement is having now a year later as opposed to when it began with such fervor? >> i was very inspired and moved by occupy wall street. i was very inspired by all-inclusive it was unlike some of the protests of the 60's the cops in some cities were horrible, but by and large the protesters went out of their way to include the cuts. i saw the sign saying you are a part of our 99%. i think the notion we are the 99% became in a updated version and honestly absolutely incontrovertible lead changed the rheto
for us to strengthen budget reserves and i believe we can cut taxes for every hoosier. but he just had to pay for in indiana. that when you were speaker of the house, for five of the six years you are funding the state house, indiana deficits. when ms. daniels came into power just a couple years later and budgets to help to write, indiana with $700 million in debt and had a deficit of $800 million. facts are stubborn things. how are we going to make sure and preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana? >> congressmen come if you spent the last 10 years in indiana, you'd know that our budget has to be balanced in indiana according to our constitution. i balanced and produce bipartisan balanced budget. and oddly, these were supported by fort wayne zone david long and the tenet of american, peggy stillman. i find it almost laughable that the united states congress and with lecture anybody about fiscal responsibility. he voted out once, not twice, but five times, congressman. you voted to edit the results increased her deficit by 200 billion, billion with a b. dollars. >> now loo
california sacramento was broken in. with every single tax. [applause] citic this crowd is not need to be reminded. [laughter] but the tax is there bowed against every single one. the last thing sacramento needs lose more money like giving heroin to a junkie. >> how do we by media? >> of also like to comment on the public-school to produce useful one's. liberal send their kids to the lily white private schools. but who always fights the vouchers to the and a male? al gore was asked in harlem when he was running for president because he was the democrat won a black reporter said if you are so big on public-school is not having vouchers why your kids go to private schools? typical move he got angry and said don't bring my children into this. wait a second. [laughter] not so fast. it is a great idea for conservative billionaires' i love fox news but why is that the only game in town? ten times the ratings but it has not occurred to cnn and msnbc they have higher ratings maybe we should try to be fair and balanced. [laughter] that seems popular. by the way a small point*, i am doing pie
budget deficit, the uncertainty that exists in america over the fiscal cliff and the tax regime and perhaps anti-business policies being practiced by some -- we're not going to go there too aggressively. and so, um, you know, whatever the case may be, the economy's growing, but it's not a feel-good economy because the growth is not rapid enough to reduce i the level of unemployment in the -- reduce the level of unemployment in the economy. giving you some support, very important area of the economy to both the consumer and consumer psychology is housing. and you see really the ingredients for a decent size recovery in housing activity. affordability is near record high, that's the top left-hand slide. home prices to disposable income is running near record low levels, so houses are cheap. in fact, the value of a home is a function of the capitalized cost of renting. rents have gone up much more relative to house price, and so now it's actually with cheaper to buy a home than to rent. but people have not been doing it aggressively yet because one of the most important expenditure
in the market. tax on savings, including the mandate for agreements with certain countries, professional politicization, he signatures. we need to get a new political push in all these areas. i use government to do their utmost to bring the contract on growth to life, like why i can't find the possibilities you please finalize in legislation on elements. let us demonstrate to our citizens to europe carries a message for growth and jobs. when talking about growth, it is clear the financial side you're makes a contribution to the secretary. the recent progress on the financial protection tax following the requests we've now received from 10 member states, this geriatric and the commission will make a proposal for a council decision and enhanced cooperation. this would be the first step in the process. we also present an action plan on tax fraud and tax evasion, including before the end of the year. i also want to concern to follow the adoption of the employment package, the commission before the end of the year has a guaranteed game. it will aim to ensure that young people with an aura mon
of the possible areas of attack of course is a tax on the nation's control systems. the control systems that operate our utilities, water plants, pipelines, financial institutions. and if you think that a control system attack that takes down a utility even for a few hours is not serious, just look at what is happening now that mother nature has taken of those utilities. the cascading effect for immediate and serious and can be life-threatening. so, the urgency, the immediacy of the cyber problem, the cyber attacks that we are undergoing and continue to undergo cannot be underestimated. we have a number of examples you've read about them in the past years. we have seen more like all traditional crime. i used to be prosecutor so traditional crime, theft, fraud, unfortunately child exploitation, child abuse. we have seen those on anticipated by the internet. we've seen that is a significant intellectual property intrusion into significant contractors united states. we've seen control systems small water plants in texas. we have and are undergoing a tax on some of the largest financial ins
information or that invite a tax. it is natural. part of this kennedy had a close knit group the boston mafia and the bollenbach they were very less leading into democratic politics. but in the cabinet he surrounded himself with a remarkably centrist range of people. robert mcnamara was a registered republican the secretary of the treasury and he made sure his advisers were very centrist. to see the left-leaning partisan people. >> host: rehab a couple minutes left. but to arrive at the university of virginia public affairs. talk about the value of these tapes. because they are so wonderful thing we can focus too much and there might be a danger. >> we have been working on these tapes at the white house since 1998. we had a whole team of people, colleagues, students , scholars, trying to work through this remarkable resource. they have to be used with care. i tried to be very careful. it is hired to write a book with a list of transcripts. we do that as part of the work. one-two embed them in a much broader story. bayous allot of other material not just the tapes. i try to balance the out. o
million domestic dollars the going towards enforcement's. $1 trillion in tax dollars. not news to anybody in this room but the wider american mainstream is waking up. i live in a place in new mexico where the cowboy hats and ladies in the post office saying barack obama was born in libya. when they ask what my book is about and i tell them it is and economic social analysis of why the end of the drug war was good for america, without fail the response is the tragedy in mexico and when is the drug war going to end? is not dangerous, when we going to stop -- left-wing or right-wing and televangelist. the truth is black and white. dangerous for me as a journalist with a few decades of experience, too much of a cheerleader about this particular issue. people are going to
widely trade craft. the new tax politics system. rasta look at it and determine that was not true. they have a lax internal security methods and that he needed improvement. not only do we do that report from, but we also made public the findings of that report. a lot of people said how can you do that? a very sensitive area. top-secret. but the push very hard to make an executive summary, the conclusions of that report now because we believe strongly that the citizens deserve their right to know what was happening in their government, and we also believe that focusing attention on a matter in a publicly could have a positive and the effect. and it was true. and i do remember when we gave the report to the fbi, we don't have the authority to declassify intermission or to let information out that the agency believes is classifier too sensitive to release. we do have unfettered access to all the information in the agency. they have to give us the information, and we handled appropriately. but then we read our report we ask them what is classified are too sensitive to be released publ
of justifying slavery. he taxed malthus with improposing a kind of moral slavery on his followers than was worse than any kind of legal slavery. is malthus, quote, proposes to introduced a system of celibacy taylor asked, who could fail to notice the difference in point of benevolence between indirect slavery to an absolute master, and direct slavery to an absolute master? in taylor's america even those subjected to quote, direct slavery to an absolute master retained the right to reproduce. in taylor's america then no matter all the other freedoms that were denied to enslaved people, including the right to legal marriage and indeed to own, quote, unquote, their own children, they nevertheless had rights to reproduce that were in danger in malthus's england. u.s. slaveholders then could boast that african-americans in bondage had greater basic liberties and privileges than supposedly free-born englishmen in malthus's britain, meanwhile white americans enjoyed natural rights to love and marriage that were impossible to imagine in the cramped english aisle. print was the key arena where these idea
reagan era for bankrupting the country. >> guest: well, it--it really is not fair. he proposed to cut tax rates. the democrats in congress panicked and said, 'we can't let them get away with this,' so they doubled him. they made the increase in cuts far more extensive than he had asked for, and it was very difficult for him to veto it, after all. and then the democrats in congress proceeded, over the next eight to 10 years, to spend far more money than economic growth, in all rationality, would have persuaded them to spend. they--i think, really, they were quite deli--deliberate in their irresponsibility, and they kept inventing programs, giving them as entitlements, regardless of the financial consequences. and they had managed to persuade a lot of people in the media it was ronald reagan who is responsible for the increase in the deficit. he's not. he tried to veto many of those bills. he could not because the democrats controlled congress, and so he was forced, willy-nilly, if you're going to have a budget at all--and mr. clinton is going to discover this--you just have to go along, in
, that administration has expanded the categories of businesses that receive preferential loans, tax dollars if they are owned by women. now, since women are winning, why the hell are we doing that? >> guest: small businesses i think differently than i think of workplaces. places that are totally like finance and law firms, those places i feel like to not acknowledge the rise of women or taken into account or accepted. why are you giving me that look. small business, it's a different question. i wish i knew more about small businesses. sao. >> host: but the principle remains. women of succeeding commoner failing in the federal government gives preference to women. >> guest: women are starting in places where i described, women still get underpaid. there just, you know, creeping their way up. you can be ahead and still be treated unfairly. i don't really think those things are necessarily have anything to do with each other. how is it that we have a work force where women are the majority and we don't have any paid maternity leave. that just does not make any sense to me. it's like we have so
during the missile crisis, but in everything he does, whether it's vietnam policy, tax policy, civil rights, constantly thinking about how will this play out and how is this going to look? i would very carefully draw the distinction between that and partisan politics in a superficial sense. i do not believe he was partisan in the superficial sense that we like to talk about that was a political decision and things like that, and a lot of the time -- we mean that superficially as a partisan way, but in a much deeper way, i think he was absolutely aware of the political ramifications, but it just wasn't -- he was careful, for instance, to brief dwight eisenhower, at that point, one the leading republican figures, gave him special briefings in the crisis, called him on the tfn, we have those recordings. he sent the cia director, director of central intelligence, john mccohen, tight in republican party politics at this point, sent him to brief eisenhower. whenever there were -- he was briefing congressional leaders, it was a bipartisan affair, not getting democratic leaders on the phone
information or volunteering things that are potentially going to invite a tax. it's just natural. it's how you govern essentially. but as i said, i would go back -- part of this, too is kennedy had a very close-knit group. there were people that went back in his political career and they were left wing anti-democratic politics but in particular in the cabinet he was surrounded himself with a remarkably centrist range of people. several republicans. john mccain, director of central intelligence, robert mcnamara who wasn't for the political but was a registered republican. douglas dillon, the secretary of the treasury, said he had made sure that a lot of his advisers were actually very centrist. he wasn't getting the left lanning partisan people around him. >> host: let me ask one last question about the tapes you've dedicated your life to the project university of public affairs. talk a little bit about the value of the tapes but also about the potential pitfalls because some of the hudson because the tapes are so wonderful that we could focus too much on them and there might be a danger to the
. a huge copper cattle from the tax. and the cattle on to the flame. five chips mugs from a covered and hesitated. the woman said you are right, six. the doctor will be here too. then the woman cursed her lips and made a noise. missed the note. he wrote it so carefully too and put it in his breast pocket and haven't looked there yet. what is it saying? read it yourself. i thought she was her mother. she seemed like somebody's mother. then she said, took all the money his friends had given him to smuggle out of south africa, along with all the money he had made over the years and went to the casino to gamble. only meant to gamble with his own money and only meant to dip into money that was given him until he made back the money he lost. and always dark. that is not what he wrote, squinting her eyes. what he wrote was to all my friends, i am so sorry, i hope you find it in your hearts to forgive me. i cannot forgive myself. same thing. said the older woman. she turned to me. you will admit my mother already in the milk shed. she was mrs. comstock before me so she is old mrs. comstock.
to the cartels in mexico should marijuana be legalized in the united states? and taxed? >> marijuana has never been utilized anywhere in the world. i am informed on that because we have four children. i don't want them to experiment with drugs but i realize as an economist if you take profit motive away from cartels, eventually they cease to exist. the initial pain would be unbelievable. difficult to say what direction that would go but in the short term the pain would be unbearable and that is why politicians are afraid to address the issue. they keep pushing it to the next election as hipolito was saying. >> as a law enforcement officer for 30 years cartels are vicious criminal elements and regardless they will seek to continue their criminal element and the honest truth as a law enforcement officer they break the law they should go to jail and be punished appropriately regardless what offense they take. the mexican government and law enforcement officers in the united states which address that and actually individuals that break the law. >> that is the last question. my name is ricardo ains
takedown? i don't know if the romney's are in on it as i would need to see their 2009 taxes. i have asked. the dog ate it. but i was able to do some investigation and i did find that one thing for certain, that they were part and parcel of a move move bond enjoyed because it's illegal, the vulture's activity in the congo and europe and elsewhere. it's not illegal in the united states where the vultures landed in detroit. now folgers fees when things die. so when mr. romney says, let detroit go bankrupt, but it died, what we are doing is creating a feast for the vulture. here is what they did. the u.s. government under obama and under by the way george bush -- it's not obama's bailout even though he pumps his chest and takes the applaud and beatings for it, was created by george w. bush voted in october and december. it was taken over by obama in the meantime. the a bomb administration picking up for bush came up with a deal to save three companies, general motors, chrysler and delphi. what is delphi? delphi is the old telco auto parts division of gm. you know delco batteries. we had gm th
believe we can cut taxes. john, you just said we pay for things in indiana. okay, but when you were speaker speaker of the house, for five of the six years, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels caiman is a couple of years later on budgets that you helped to write, indiana was a 700 million-dollar state in debt, and had a deficit of $820 million. facts are stubborn things. i would just like to know for my colleagues how we are going to make sure we can preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana. >> congressman, if you would've spent the last 12 years in indiana rather than in congress come up you would know that our balanced budget has to be done according to the constitution. i have balanced and produced bipartisan budgets. oddly, you talk about fort wayne's own day long in our lieutenant governor. i find it almost laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anyone about fiscal responsibility. you heard it not once, not twice, but five times, congressman. you voted and the results increased the deficit by $200 billion. >> find key house and senate in gove
't file taxes, so the information, because they're not required to, they may not be required to file taxes. so snap information may be available in a way that you can fast-track their medicaid eligibility determination because they provided recent information to the snap agency picks i don't think that, that really complicates the opportunities for cordoning between snap and medicaid significantly. >> thank you very much. i am going to give our panelists an opportunity if any of you have closing remarks you would like to jump in with before rapid a. okay, thank you all very much for coming. [applause] >> today, "washington journal" looks at ohio as a battleground state. >> these are the stories left, great stress but real people in american history, very important moments in american history that we don't know that. the first pilgrims in america came 50 years before the mayflower sailed. they were french. they made wind. they are the good sense to live in florida in june instead of december in massachusetts, but then they were wiped out by the spanish. we completely let the story out of th
care exchange, two things occurred. the tax credit the individual employees may qualify for don't go to that state and consequential we neither does the employer penalty for failing to provide health insurance. the irs this regard that language this year and said they were going to enforce the penalty. in all states with the health care exchange had been adopted or not oklahoma up until now has not adopted the exchange. we have amended some of you in this room know this but when the -- when i was elected in january, sworn in in january 2011 oklahoma filed a separate action in addition to virginia and the proceeding in florida because we had a constitutional amendment that we adopted with respect to the affordable care act so they might after the supreme court decision came down in june of this year. after it came down we amended our complete and we have now added a claim dealing with this issue under the affordable care act and the alliance must rule on may 18th to preserve the policy, the decision that oklahoma has made to not adopt a health care exchange for the policy decisions an
's for the supreme court does. they reach citizens united and in roe v. wade. they reached out morris p. taxes and they reached out in roper versus simmons to the juvenile to tunnel the case. the people who don't want them to reach out in this case, many of them coming to want them to reach out anytime it helps their cause and maybe they even reached out and shot a case, which is allen's case. and my point they are is a court should just make things up, but they are to a large extent a policymaking body. it has evolved that way and that's what they do. they take cases and decide broader principles under those cases. and here we have a very serious problem that is a little bit of stretching out my pen to ban racial preferences but impose the remedies suggested transparency and assist you in another component because as her book details, every other institution in american society has failed to come to grips to this problem. the at the university systematically lead applicants and the rest of the country over how it works. the politicians are terrified of it. no major politician has attacked aff
in your tax rate is asked in you, that's why. he he bought a ton truck or he decided not to buy a contract. so vermont can send a message to the rest of the united states which you can govern locally. nationally it's almost as cute, nice, but you can't really do that. you can't and we do. i published with susan clark his book about town meeting, deliberation in town meeting and reforms, called others in favor, it was susan's idea and she's the force behind it, but we are both worried the town meeting tradition is suffering and that we needed to write a popular book, a readable book. it's an argument for town meeting. the new england town is really a cultural phenomenon in children grow up in a vermont town, watching their parents arguing about it the next day, from owning other citizens, all very real. so by the time you're in high school come unix equity town meeting is in pretty much had to behave in it because you englanders generally are pretty good at deliberation. they know about the rules. i started newcomers, 90 into a town meeting, the two emotions. one is often boredom. they thin
obligated to care for your mom. and for smoking the green, we want to legalize a it, tax it, use that money to invest in stocks and she doesn't use that money to buy back america from china. [laughter] [applause] america, it is probably very clear to you right now that your democracy is due north. so when you go into that polling station next year, consider a country you truly deserve, canada. thank you. [applause] >> is such a handsome man. sometimes they won't tell the canadians together. this is the guy we got. i'm going to read a short section. section 3.2 from the irony of being ironic in a post- ironic age. this is about the citizens united decision. stop putting your politicians on layaway and start buying them outright at the bed bath and beyond. before i introduce this chapter, before i get going, let me thank you guys for coming. you guys are awesome. i'm going to read citizens divided, people are now corporations. before i get started, a quick facts. everyone has affected a promise. exxon and wal-mart, they are now the largest people in the united states. the average american is
in the mid-states and taxed? [applause] >> technically marijuana has never been legalized anywhere in the world yet it's been decriminalized. i'm sort of torn on that issue because i have four children. i don't want them to experiment with the drug convict the same time they realized as an economist that he take the profit motive away from the cartel's come and they eventually will cease to exist. the initial pain would be unbelievable, but it's difficult to say what direction that would go in. but i do think it would in the short-term the pain would be unbearable and that's why politicians are afraid to address the issue. they keep pushing it off until the next election. >> as a law enforcement officer for 30 years, the cartels are a vicious criminal elements and regardless they'll seek to continue their criminal elements connected beyond the street in my view as a law enforcement officer as they break the law, they should go to jail or be punished appropriately, regardless of what the sensei k. so if we want an effect on the cartels, the mexican government and law enforcement in
to strengthen our reserves and cut taxes for every hoosier. but, john, you just said we pay for things in indiana, okay in but when you were speaker of the house, for five of the six years that you were running the statehouse, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels came into power just a couple years later, indiana was $700 million in debt and had a deficit of $820 million. you know, john, facts are stubborn things, and i'd just like to know from my colleagues on stage how are with we going to make sure and preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana? >> congressman if you'd spend the last 12 years in indiana rather than congress, you'd know our budget has to be balanced according to our constitution. i've balanced and produced bipartisan balanced budgets and, oddly, these you talk about, they were supported by fort wayne's own david long and our lieutenant governor, becky skillman. i find it almost laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anybody about fiscal responsibility. you voted not once, not twice, but five times, congressman, you voted -- and the re
tax increment districts we have in the city that create separate financial and governance structures so that really as much as downtown looks better than i think i've seen it my entire life, the benefits of that are not integrated into, you know, the old neighborhoods question. so within the city limits you have a tremendous overlap and overlay of governmental jurisdictions, right? separate fund raising ability, separate governance. within the region i think it's 140 municipalities within metropolitan detroit as we try to address some of the environmental challenges, how do you bring all of these different entities onto one page? i worry about the capacity for planning, the institutional capacity to make use of a lot of these amazing innovations. >> right. >> that gasty is broad -- capacity is broad at this to make the region competitive in a development sense. that capacity is within city government to be sure that our inspectors even know what green roof and, you know, all that engineering stuff, um, you know, how do you keep people's skill sets up-to-date if you don't have the abi
our budget reserves, and i believe we can cut taxes for every hoosier. but, john, you just said that we pay for things in indiana, okay? but when you were speaker of the house, for five of the six years that you were running the statehouse, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels came into power just a couple years later on budgets you helped to write, indiana was $700 million in debt and had a deficit of $820 million. you know, john, facts are stubborn things, and i'd just like to know from my colleagues on stage how are we going to make sure and preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana? >> congressman, if you'd have spent the last 12 years in indiana rather than in congress, you'd know that our budget has to be balanced. indiana, according to our constitution. i've balanced and produced bipartisan balanced budgets, and oldly, these -- oddly, these you talk about, they were supported by david long and our lieutenant governor, becky skillman. i find it laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anybody about fiscal responsibility. you voted not once,
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